Jones Ford Casa Grande - How does a 2016 Ford F-150 compare to its competition in Safety Near Casa Grande, AZ?


 
  • Jones Ford Casa Grande Journal
  • Apr 2nd 2017 - 142 days ago
  • Casa Grande, AZ
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Compared To Toyota Tundra 2016



The rear seatbelts optional on the F‑150 SuperCrew inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Tundra doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum offers an optional collision warning system, which detects an impending crash through forward mounted sensors and flashes a bright light and sounds a loud, distinctive tone to warn the driver to brake or maneuver immediately to avoid a collision. The system also pre-charges the brakes to begin deceleration more quickly. The Tundra doesn\'t offer a collision warning system.

Full-time four-wheel drive is optional on the F‑150. Full-time four-wheel drive gives added traction for safety in all conditions, not just off-road, like the only system available on the Tundra.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Tundra doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum offers an optional 360-Degree Camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Tundra only offers a rear monitor and front and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the sides.

The F‑150 offers optional SYNC ®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Tundra doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the F‑150 and the Tundra have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available daytime running lights, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 is safer than the Toyota Tundra:

F‑150

Tundra

OVERALL STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Neck Injury Risk

30%

41%

Neck Stress

301 lbs.

367 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

119/121 lbs.

474/515 lbs.

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

121

291

Chest Compression

.4 inches

.6 inches

Neck Injury Risk

38%

50%

Neck Stress

150 lbs.

205 lbs.

Neck Compression

4 lbs.

70 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

469/233 lbs.

557/390 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 SuperCab is safer than the Tundra Double Cab:

F‑150

Tundra

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Restraints

GOOD

GOOD

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Max Chest Compression

22 cm

25 cm

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Femur Force R/L

1.6/3.1 kN

1.9/3.4 kN

Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L

0%/1%

0%/1%

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

POOR

Tibia index R/L

.58/.49

1.4/.8

Tibia forces R/L

2.5/1.8 kN

5.8/6.7 kN

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 is safer than the Toyota Tundra:

F‑150

Tundra

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Abdominal Force

85 G’s

101 G’s

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Max Damage Depth

11 inches

16 inches

Hip Force

460 lbs.

682 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the F‑150 the rating of “Top Pick” for 2016, a rating granted to only 89 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Tundra is not a “Top Pick” for 2016.




Compared To GMC Sierra 2016



The rear seatbelts optional on the F‑150 SuperCrew inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Sierra doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum offers an optional 360-Degree Camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Sierra only offers a rear monitor and front and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the sides.

To help make backing safer, the F‑150 (except XL)’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The Sierra doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

Both the F‑150 and the Sierra have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available four-wheel drive, collision warning systems, daytime running lights, lane departure warning systems and blind spot warning systems.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 is safer than the GMC Sierra:

F‑150

Sierra

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

189

298

Neck Injury Risk

30%

38%

Neck Stress

301 lbs.

406 lbs.

Neck Compression

19 lbs.

189 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

119/121 lbs.

174/350 lbs.

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

121

235

Chest Compression

.4 inches

.4 inches

Neck Stress

150 lbs.

165 lbs.

Neck Compression

4 lbs.

65 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 SuperCab is safer than the Sierra Crew Cab:

F‑150

Sierra

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

MARGINAL

Restraints

GOOD

GOOD

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Steering Column Movement Rearward

3 cm

11 cm

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Max Chest Compression

22 cm

23 cm

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Femur Force R/L

1.6/3.1 kN

4.5/4.7 kN

Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L

0%/1%

2%/2%

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

POOR

Tibia index R/L

.58/.49

1.07/.51

Tibia forces R/L

2.5/1.8 kN

6/3.2 kN

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 is safer than the GMC Sierra:

F‑150

Sierra

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

22

68

Hip Force

174 lbs.

269 lbs.

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Max Damage Depth

11 inches

17 inches

Spine Acceleration

42 G’s

51 G’s

Hip Force

460 lbs.

971 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the F‑150 the rating of “Top Pick” for 2016, a rating granted to only 89 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Sierra is not a “Top Pick” for 2016.




Compared To Nissan Titan XD 2016



The rear seatbelts optional on the F‑150 SuperCrew inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Titan XD doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum offers an optional collision warning system, which detects an impending crash through forward mounted sensors and flashes a bright light and sounds a loud, distinctive tone to warn the driver to brake or maneuver immediately to avoid a collision. The system also pre-charges the brakes to begin deceleration more quickly. The Titan XD doesn\'t offer a collision warning system.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Titan XD doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The F‑150 offers optional SYNC ®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Titan XD doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the F‑150 and the Titan XD have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available four-wheel drive, daytime running lights, blind spot warning systems, around view monitors and rear cross-path warning.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the F‑150 the rating of “Top Pick” for 2016, a rating granted to only 89 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Titan XD has not been tested, yet.




Compared To Chevrolet Silverado 2016



The rear seatbelts optional on the F‑150 SuperCrew inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Silverado doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum offers an optional 360-Degree Camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Silverado only offers a rear monitor and front and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the sides.

To help make backing safer, the F‑150 (except XL)’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The Silverado doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

Both the F‑150 and the Silverado have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available four-wheel drive, collision warning systems, daytime running lights, lane departure warning systems and blind spot warning systems.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 is safer than the Chevrolet Silverado:

F‑150

Silverado

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

189

298

Neck Injury Risk

30%

38%

Neck Stress

301 lbs.

406 lbs.

Neck Compression

19 lbs.

189 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

119/121 lbs.

174/350 lbs.

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

121

235

Chest Compression

.4 inches

.4 inches

Neck Stress

150 lbs.

165 lbs.

Neck Compression

4 lbs.

65 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 SuperCab is safer than the Silverado Double Cab:

F‑150

Silverado

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Restraints

GOOD

GOOD

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

POOR

Tibia index R/L

.58/.49

1.14/.48

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 is safer than the Chevrolet Silverado:

F‑150

Silverado

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

22

68

Hip Force

174 lbs.

269 lbs.

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Max Damage Depth

11 inches

17 inches

Spine Acceleration

42 G’s

51 G’s

Hip Force

460 lbs.

971 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the F‑150 the rating of “Top Pick” for 2016, a rating granted to only 89 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Silverado is not a “Top Pick” for 2016.




Compared To Ram 1500 2016



The rear seatbelts optional on the F‑150 SuperCrew inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Ram 1500 doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum offers an optional collision warning system, which detects an impending crash through forward mounted sensors and flashes a bright light and sounds a loud, distinctive tone to warn the driver to brake or maneuver immediately to avoid a collision. The system also pre-charges the brakes to begin deceleration more quickly. The Ram 1500 doesn\'t offer a collision warning system.

When descending a steep, off-road slope, the F‑150 4X4’s optional Hill Descent Control allows you to creep down safely. The Ram 1500 doesn’t offer Hill Descent Control.

The Ford F‑150 offers Daytime Running Lights to help keep it more visible under all conditions. Canadian government studies show that driving with lights during the day reduces accidents by 11% by making vehicles more conspicuous. The Ram 1500 doesn’t offer Daytime Running Lights.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Ram 1500 doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum offers an optional 360-Degree Camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Ram 1500 only offers a rear monitor and front and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the sides.

To help make backing safer, the F‑150 (except XL)’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The Ram 1500 doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

Both the F‑150 and the Ram 1500 have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available four-wheel drive and blind spot warning systems.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 is safer than the Ram 1500:

F‑150

Ram 1500

OVERALL STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

189

254

Neck Stress

301 lbs.

353 lbs.

Neck Compression

19 lbs.

33 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

119/121 lbs.

751/404 lbs.

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

121

306

Chest Compression

.4 inches

.4 inches

Neck Injury Risk

38%

44%

Neck Stress

150 lbs.

224 lbs.

Neck Compression

4 lbs.

93 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

469/233 lbs.

597/346 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 SuperCab is safer than the Ram 1500 Crew Cab:

F‑150

1500

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

MARGINAL

Restraints

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Steering Column Movement Rearward

3 cm

27 cm

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Max Chest Compression

22 cm

26 cm

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

POOR

Tibia index R/L

.58/.49

1.33/.59

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 is safer than the Ram 1500:

F‑150

Ram 1500

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Chest Movement

.8 inches

1 inches

Abdominal Force

85 G’s

147 G’s

Hip Force

174 lbs.

192 lbs.

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Max Damage Depth

11 inches

24 inches

HIC

414

483

Spine Acceleration

42 G’s

48 G’s

Hip Force

460 lbs.

681 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety ( IIHS) performs roof strength tests. In that test the F‑150 earned the top rating of “Good” because its roof supported over four times the F‑150’s weight before being crushed five inches. The Ram 1500 was rated two rankings lower at “Marginal.”

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the F‑150 the rating of “Top Pick” for 2016, a rating granted to only 89 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Ram 1500 is not a “Top Pick” for 2016.




Compared To Nissan Titan 2015



The rear seatbelts optional on the F‑150 SuperCrew inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Titan doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum offers an optional collision warning system, which detects an impending crash through forward mounted sensors and flashes a bright light and sounds a loud, distinctive tone to warn the driver to brake or maneuver immediately to avoid a collision. The system also pre-charges the brakes to begin deceleration more quickly. The Titan doesn\'t offer a collision warning system.

Full-time four-wheel drive is optional on the F‑150. Full-time four-wheel drive gives added traction for safety in all conditions, not just off-road, like the only system available on the Titan.

When descending a steep, off-road slope, the F‑150 4X4’s optional Hill Descent Control allows you to creep down safely. The Titan doesn’t offer Hill Descent Control.

The Ford F‑150 offers Daytime Running Lights to help keep it more visible under all conditions. Canadian government studies show that driving with lights during the day reduces accidents by 11% by making vehicles more conspicuous. The Titan doesn’t offer Daytime Running Lights.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Titan doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The F‑150 Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum offers an optional 360-Degree Camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Titan only offers a rear monitor and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the front or sides.

To help make backing safer, the F‑150 (except XL)’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The Titan doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

The F‑150 offers optional SYNC ®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Titan doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the F‑150 and the Titan have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding and available blind spot warning systems.

In a 31 MPH side-impact test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crashes a 3300 pound sled into the side of new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford F‑150 SuperCab is safer than the Titan Crew Cab:

F‑150

Titan

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

MARGINAL

Structure

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Driver

Head Protection Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Head Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Torso Injury Rating

GOOD

POOR

Pelvis/Leg Injury Rating

GOOD

MARGINAL

Head Injury Criterion

118

323

Shoulder Movement

26 mm

47 mm

Rear Passenger

Head Protection Rating

GOOD

MARGINAL

Head Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Torso Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Pelvis/Leg Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety ( IIHS) performs roof strength tests. In that test the F‑150 earned the top rating of “Good” because its roof supported over four times the F‑150’s weight before being crushed five inches. The Titan was rated lower at “Acceptable.”

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety rates the general design of front seat head restraints for their ability to protect front seat occupants from whiplash injuries. The IIHS also performs a dynamic test on those seats with “good” or “acceptable” geometry. In these ratings, the F‑150 is safer then the Titan:

F‑150

Titan

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Head Restraint Design

GOOD

GOOD

Distance from Back of Head

24 mm

89 mm

Distance Below Top of Head

26 mm

33 mm

Dynamic Test Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Seat Design

Pass

Pass

Neck Force Rating

Low

Low

Max Neck Shearing Force

0

36

Max Neck Tension

419

499

(Lower numerical results are better in all tests.)

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety rates the F‑150 as a “Top Pick” for 2015. The Titan is not a “Top Pick.”