How does a 2016 Ford Transit Wagon compare to its competition in Safety?


 
  • Journal
  • Dec 12th 2017 - 429 days ago
  • Casa Grande, AZ
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Compared To Nissan NV Passenger 2016



The Transit Wagon has standard child safety locks to prevent children from opening the rear doors. The NV Passenger doesn’t offer child safety locks.

The Transit Wagon’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane. The NV Passenger doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Transit Wagon’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The NV Passenger doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

For better protection of the passenger compartment, the Transit Wagon uses safety cell construction with a three-dimensional high-strength frame that surrounds the passenger compartment. It provides extra impact protection and a sturdy mounting location for door hardware and side impact beams. The NV Passenger uses a body-on-frame design, which has no frame members above the floor of the vehicle.

The Transit Wagon offers optional SYNC ®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The NV Passenger doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Transit Wagon and the NV Passenger have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available daytime running lights and rear parking sensors.




Compared To Chevrolet Express 2016



The Transit Wagon’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane. The Express doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Transit Wagon’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Express doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

For better protection of the passenger compartment, the Transit Wagon uses safety cell construction with a three-dimensional high-strength frame that surrounds the passenger compartment. It provides extra impact protection and a sturdy mounting location for door hardware and side impact beams. The Express uses a body-on-frame design, which has no frame members above the floor of the vehicle.

Both the Transit Wagon and the Express have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, side-impact head airbags, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available daytime running lights and rear parking sensors.




Compared To Sprinter Metris Passenger 2016



The Transit Wagon offers optional SYNC ®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Metris Passenger doesn’t offer a GPS response system, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Transit Wagon and the Metris Passenger have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available daytime running lights, lane departure warning systems, rear parking sensors and driver alert monitors.

The Ford Transit Wagon weighs 720 to 2170 pounds more than the Mercedes Metris Passenger. The NHTSA advises that heavier vehicles are much safer in collisions than their significantly lighter counterparts.




Compared To Sprinter Passenger Van 2015



The Transit Wagon has standard head airbag curtains for all three seat rows, which act as a forgiving barrier between the driver and outboard passenger\'s upper bodies and the window and pillars. Combined with high-strength steel door beams and lower side airbags this system increases head protection in broadside collisions. Head airbags cost extra in the Sprinter Passenger Van.

The Transit Wagon’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Sprinter Passenger Van doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

The Transit Wagon offers optional SYNC ®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Sprinter Passenger Van doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Transit Wagon and the Sprinter Passenger Van have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available daytime running lights, lane departure warning systems and rear parking sensors.




Compared To Nissan NV Passenger 2015



The Transit Wagon has standard child safety locks to prevent children from opening the rear doors. The NV Passenger doesn’t offer child safety locks.

The Transit Wagon’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane. The NV Passenger doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Transit Wagon’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The NV Passenger doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

For better protection of the passenger compartment, the Transit Wagon uses safety cell construction with a three-dimensional high-strength frame that surrounds the passenger compartment. It provides extra impact protection and a sturdy mounting location for door hardware and side impact beams. The NV Passenger uses a body-on-frame design, which has no frame members above the floor of the vehicle.

The Transit Wagon offers optional SYNC ®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The NV Passenger doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Transit Wagon and the NV Passenger have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available daytime running lights and rear parking sensors.




Compared To GMC Savana 2016



The Transit Wagon’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane. The Savana doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Transit Wagon’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Savana doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

For better protection of the passenger compartment, the Transit Wagon uses safety cell construction with a three-dimensional high-strength frame that surrounds the passenger compartment. It provides extra impact protection and a sturdy mounting location for door hardware and side impact beams. The Savana uses a body-on-frame design, which has no frame members above the floor of the vehicle.

Both the Transit Wagon and the Savana have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, side-impact head airbags, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available daytime running lights and rear parking sensors.




Compared To Sprinter Passenger Van 2016



The Transit Wagon has standard head airbag curtains for all three seat rows that act as a forgiving barrier between the driver and outboard passenger\'s upper bodies and the window and pillars. Combined with high-strength steel door beams and lower side airbags this system increases head protection in broadside collisions. Head airbags cost extra in the Sprinter Passenger Van.

The Transit Wagon’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Sprinter Passenger Van doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

The Transit Wagon offers optional SYNC ®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Sprinter Passenger Van doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Transit Wagon and the Sprinter Passenger Van have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available daytime running lights, lane departure warning systems and rear parking sensors.